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of the chair. signed: patrick j. leahy, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business for an hour. republicans will control the first half, the majority the second half. following morning business, we'll resume consideration of the supplemental appropriation bill. i mentioned last night, madam president, that we're going to have to move forward on this bill. i have been told that the republicans want to have a substitute, and we look forward to whatever that might be, that we can set up a series of votes to satisfy those people who want to change this bill in some manner. i would just note that the people in the northeast, other states but principally new york and new jersey, there are 700,000 people who have lost their homes and are still -- tens of thousands of those homes have been destroyed. other people are still living in very, very difficult situations. when we had this devastation we had in new orleans, we got the aid to those states very quickly. the po
that work. thank you, madam president. and i thank my colleagues. i yield the floor and note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: mr. mccain: i ask that further proceedings under the quorum call be suspended and that i be recognized to address the senate as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: one of the most overused quotes about this town is harry truman's observation years ago that if you want a friend in washington, go out and get a dog. i spent a good many years here now, and i suppose there is a little truth in that advice. some washington friendships can be a little like temporary alliances between nations that for a brief period of time have mutual interests or enemies, but not all friendships here are like that. not all of them. today i say a former fond farewell to a departing colleague whose friendship has been and will always be one of the greatest treasures of my life. my friend senator joe lieberman is retiring from the senate after 24 years
attention. madam chair and colleagues, i think you've concluded your draft of water resources bill in which i appreciate and i hope we can address that later this year. unfortunately, other areas where this will protect it and saw. this first photo -- this is a new bridge over the indian river inland. you can ask the atlantic ocean to the delaware. that's a new bridge could be spent over $200 million on the bridge in the last several years. a lot of federal money, quite a bit of state. this is the old bridge. it disappeared. it's gone. this is a highway to the old bridge. ron. four months ago people make their way up and down the east coast. today the bridge is completely gone along with highway approaches. the new bridge are threatened and we want to make sure we've made a $200 million investment that we don't use the bridge. until the bridge can work underwater. unfortunately you can't get to the bridge and the beaches of rio to the easter pÂtÉ densities to be there argonne and they need to be replaced. thank you. in addition, a huge breach fewell -- with the delaware bay and delaware r
? i yield the floor, senator leahy. mr. leahy: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: madam president, what is the parliament situation? the presiding officer: the senate is in a period of morning business. mr. leahy: i thank the distinguished presiding officer. i assume then that we're going back and forth? the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: madam president, i would be happy to accommodate other senators, but i came to the floor to speak for about ten minutes on the supplemental. i see senator mccain. i don't know if he came to speak on senator inouye or the supplemental. senator merkley and senator stabenow want to offer an amendment or introduce an amendment. is that appropriate? the presiding officer: the senator is correct. that is appropriate. the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: i would request we do as usual in morning business, back and forth, if that's all right. if i could follow the senator from louisiana? the presiding officer: without objection. ms. landrieu: and if the senator would yield, the senat
. altmire: thank you, madam speaker. i appreciate it. i will not speak for nearly 60 minutes. i'm tempted to engage the gentleman, my good friend, mr. woodall, in debate, but i won't do that because i know he's still smarting from his bulldog's loss over the weekend and i'm going to let him continue to think about that. i very much enjoy the friendship and camaraderie with mr. woodall, we do have a difference of opinion on some of those issues. before i start, madam speaker, i would say to the group, the individual who will be speaking following my presentation, that i plan to only speak for about five minutes. or less. so this will not be an hour-long presentation. so the speaker who will follow me on the majority side i would recommend they hang near the floor because i will be wrapping up shortly. madam speaker, i rise to commemorate the 50th anniversary of laroche college. founded in 1963 by the sisters of divine providence in mccandliss, pennsylvania, a suburb of pittsburgh, it was named in honor of ma reap laroche, the first superior of the congregation of the sister of divine provi
session. mr. reid: madam president, i ask unanimous consent that we now proceed to a period of morning business and that senators are allowed to speak for up to ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: madam president, i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to calendar number 246, s. 1792. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: calendar numbered 246, s. 1792, a bill to clarify the authority of the united states marshals service and so forth. the presiding officer: without objection, the senate will proceed to the measure. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the bill be read a third time, passed, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table, there being no intervening action or debate and that any statements related to this matter be placed in the record at the appropriate place as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i now ask we proceed to calendar numbered 233, s. 1793. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: calendar 233, s. 1793, a bill to amend title 28 united states code, and so forth and f
. madam president, it's been difficult to envision the day when i would be saying farewell to the senate. just as it was impossible to imagine i would one day become the united states senate rss is growing at a name. but such is the miracle of america that a young girl of a greek immigrant in first-generation american could in time be elected to serve in the greatest delivered his body the world has ever known and become the third longest-serving woman in the history of the united states congress. and so, in contemplating how to begin my remarks today, first minute of the words of the renowned poet, ralph waldo alarcon, who said cultivated the habit of being grateful for every good thing that comes to you and to give thanks continuously. and because all things have contributed to your advantage, you should include all things in your gratitude. that perfectly encapsulates how i am feeling on this day, madam president, thankful and blessed. and in that light, i first and foremost want to thank the people of maine for allowing me to be her voice, their vote and their champion for 16 years i
, and so forth and for other purposes. mr. leahy: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: mr. president, on behalf of senator inouye, the chair would send -- the clerk has reported the bill; is that correct? the presiding officer: the senator is correct. mr. leahy: you have a substitute amendment which is at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: the senator from vermont, mr. leahy, for mr. mr. mr. inouye proposes amendment 3338. mr. leahy: on behalf of mr. inouye, i have an amendment to the substitute which is at the desk. the presiding officer: without objection, the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from vermont, mr. leahy, for mr. inouye, proposes an amendment, number 3339. mr. leahy: mr. president, i'm going to speak briefly on this in just a moment. in the meantime, i will suggest the absence of a quorum, but i will call it off very quickly. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy
a question. i do maim madam chairman have questions i would like to submit to the secretary and directer fugate. i don't want to take my time here. with your permission, i'll submit the question and you can get the answers back to us. i want to focus now on not just fundings needing for recovery porks -- portions of the recovery, but i think there's a common theme throughout the morning's testimony by the various senators. it is that how do beget beyond just basic of recovery. to and restoration to really the mitigations aspects? and kind of challenge that we're looking there relative to this what turn out to be an inextraordinary cause when you look at the map that was presented here in terms of the extent of this storm, the population that lives within that red zone, and purple zone, and the density of construction businesses and et. cetera, et. cetera, et. cetera. we're talking about an enormous amount of money and mitigation that would be necessary to bring us to the so-called 21st century protection from what appears to be ever increasingly the devastating storms. we are not talking
. but again, all these other things, go to the table and negotiate. >> madam leader. >> yes, sir. >> $600 billion is the president on entitlement cuts and something -- $600 billion i think is the number they put out. is there any movement in that? >> 44u7bd is what i heard -- 400 is what i heard. when you look at what this is. if you'ring trophies and you want to scout in order to -- if you want to scaaple seniors before you touch one hair on the wealthiest people in our country, then what's the discussion about that? are we serious in terms of economic security for our seniors and their families protected, then that's along the conversation about where we go. i said over and over, if you want to talk about social security, having it on the table, it's on its own table. any savings from social security that can be created should stay to strengthen the life of social security, not to give a tax cut to wealthy people and call that deficit reduction. >> madam leader, you said that markets so far has been fairly confident that there's going to be a deal here. >> i say that must be wise. >> wh
and eyes on the ground and personal experience. >> thank you madame chair and to the witnesses. i have three points. briefly. to express my real sympathy for the support of all victims of sandy might be not homes, businesses and livelihood. and has said tragic human face and we need to keep that in mind. i am supportive of acting quickly of aid to immediately help those victims. we need to do that in a thoughtful, responsive, resp onsible way with the mayor can taxpayer in mind. second govett with the sba, there is good news and room for continuing improvement. we have come along way positively since hurricane katrina and rita and your response has been significantly improved. the initial response 2005 was low, and adequate to before steve preston took over and turned to the disaster program around and it has improved. we could work in this committee to enact further improvements and reform that senator landrieu mentioned. i was proud to work with her and others including the sba disaster reform 2008 farm bill. but we can continue to learn and to improve and enact reform and we can in
in this situation. senator vitter? >> thanks, madame chair. i want to make three points briefly. first of all, again, i want to express my real sympathy for all the victims of sandy. this was a horrible, devastating disaster, wiping out homes, businesses, and livelihoods and it has a tragic human face and we need to keep that in mind. i'm certainly supportive of acting quickly in terms of help and aid that is going to directly, immediately help those victims. we also need to do that in a thoughtful and responsive -- responsible way with the american taxpayer in mind we can do both of those things. so i certainly support that. secondly on the s.p.a. side i think there is good news and there is room for counting improvement. the good news i do think we've come a long way, positively since katrina and rita. and the s.p.a. disaster response has been improved. the response in 2005 was slow an inadequate before steven preston took over and turned the program around and it has improved since then. were able to work on this committee in a bipartisan to write and enact further reforms that the senator mentio
? >> thanks, madame chair. i want to make three points briefly. first of all, again, i want to express my real sympathy for all the victims of sandy. this was a horrible, devastating disaster, wiping out homes, businesses, and livelihoods and it has a tragic human face and we need to keep that in mind. i'm certainly supportive of acting quickly in terms of help and aid that is going to directly, immediately help those victims. we also need to do that in a thoughtful and responsive -- responsible way with the american taxpayer in mind we can do both of those things. so i certainly support that. secondly on the s.p.a. side i think there is good news and there is room for counting improvement. the good news i do think we've come a long way, positively since katrina and rita. and the s.p.a. disaster response has been improved. the response in 2005 was slow an inadequate before steven preston took over and turned the program around and it has improved since then. we were able to work on this committee in a bipartisan to write and enact further reforms that the senator mentioned. i was proud to work
commend the fema administrator. >> i thank you, madam chairman. for being a strong leadership. >> i cannot tell you how much the words men. >> the president could not have appoint add better person. >> you and your people have established one thing, that when the call goes out the country is there to help their people. >>eric: but try telling that to some of the victims of sandy. welcome, everyone, i am here for neil cavuto. they could be satisfied but try telling that to this guy. (inaudible). >> they are worried about vandalism or squatters taking over their house. what are you doing? we want a place to call home. we want to be somewhere for the dam holidays not in someone else's house or a hotel or a shelter. we need answers. >>eric: the resident from staten island you just saw, says no one should be patting themselves on the bang. not yet. thank you for joining us, scott. what we need to tell the audience what is behind you, sir? >>guest: this is my house. this is where me and my wife and dog sleep each night. we don't have no heat. no hot water. no electric. we are using generators th
incidentally has its own budget shortfall. madam chairman, as your reference, we seem to be entering an age of increasingly violent storms. at think we really have to think carefully about whether and how to rebuild and locations we know of vulnerable and likely to be hit again which means as we go forward we have to take some vision and think about how we replace critical infrastructure. for instance, during each of the three storms in connecticut in the past year. we have most seriously been impacted by a long-term power outages as a result of our aging electrical distribution system. therefore i hope we will use this opportunity to up some power lines underground move measures of stations away from the store. other mitigation projects include front -- want protection , rhoda improvements, gardening or relocation. the estimated cost for similar projects, and towns, and infrastructure, estimated by our gunners office at $3 billion. the failure to adequately fund mitigation and resilient efforts will only lead to greater federal spending in the future as extreme weather events, including an
. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. coburn: and i believe i'm through, madam chairman, and i would make the following point. ms. mikulski: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. ms. mikulski: again i want to thank the gentleman from oklahoma for offering all of his amendments. i would like to comment on coburn 3370, division 1 on the tax cheats. i certainly want to compliment him on that amendment. every single senator wants to prevent tax cheating, tax cheaters from receiving any funding in this bill. i'm for all of these prohibitions on tax cheats. i carry a similar provision in my usual and customary commerce-justice bill. the senator from oklahoma also is very sensitive about modifying it. his bill covers tax cheats and also dead people can't get federal funds. he modified it to cover funeral expenses. but we've also been told that this, by the finance committee that this amendment is not a blue-slip issue. i support the gentleman's amendment. and if it's agreeable with the gentleman from oklahoma on this side, we would like to take his amendment tonig
the fta still involved in that. we will save time and money because we do. >> finally, madam secretary, let me go back to a, you made -- comment you made about having the resources necessary to understand and rely upon so that a community or an individual or a business can make and inform -- make an informed decision, depending upon or relying upon that that decision will be funded at the end of the day. whether the consequences of not having the resources -- what are the consequences of not having the resources under which you would make those decisions? >> the recovery will take longer. as you wait longer, it becomes more expensive. that is why it is critical, and we have seen this time and again with our experiences in mississippi, louisiana, iowa, where, when communities understand the funding they have and are able to plan years down the line -- they take the data they have and are able to plan years down the line. that is critical to know what the resources are right up front. we're going to ask them to plan for recovery based on their unmet needs and based on the funding availab
address that. senator mikulski. >> thank you, madam chair. >> if your not careful coming will have a mikulski and that is worse. trust me. you'd be happy to have one. >> am i not right, senator murray? >> that can be my next one. really, i want to they and you and the ranking member. this has been a great hearing. what you bring his experience in this area as the senator from louisiana and there is a great sense of compassion and also reform. we have a big job but if we could work together, we could institute reforms, responds in a very creative, compassionate way and keep an eye on the bottom line. i think that is what the people in the country and those affected would want us to do. right now, there is heartbreak in maryland. what i do want to comment on quickly are some of the things that are working. we do want to thank the president for quickly issuing the declaration of a general disaster -- a general disaster declaration. we thank secretary napolitano. i speak to her availability. fema, you have been on the job. we really want to thank you for that. the problem is the indivi
starting in 2013. thank you, madam chair. >> thank you. i'm going to end with you saying how important is for congress to act or not on the supplemental and what are your people saying about the signal that may send to them. i know 60 billion is a significant number. in your experience, what you're seeing on the ground, what are your telling you about the importance of that recovery package click >> is extremely important both for local businesses and for a visit in. for the people impacted by this time in people staying with friends in other areas are right now making the decision if were going to go out of business. so it's extremely important and the sooner the better can be acted on so we can get this unmet need and get people back to living in their homes and keep their businesses so important for a local economy. >> mr. law and mr. king. >> as i mentioned, our state government is doing their part. philanthropic communities do their part. but i must make it the approval of the president's proposed package of aid to our region, were not going to recover. so it's critically importan
for the record, and thank you. >> thank you, administrator. madam secretary? >> good morning. chairman men endezz, members of the subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to testify regarding recovery from superstorm sandy. in my roll as deputy assistant secretary for grant programs at h.u.d., i am responsible for the community development program, the cbdg, the cbdg is critical to helping communities recover from and rebuild after natural disasters. this morning i will discuss sandy's impact on housing and the work that h.u.d. has started and will continue through cdbg for long-term recovery. additional details on these points and on secretary donovan's role as head of the president's sandy recovery task force are provided in my break-in testimony. hurricane sandy and the nor'easter that followed have had massive and varied impacts along the atlantic coast from virginia to rhode island, especially hard hit were new york and new jersey, two of our nation's critical economic engines. one of the major effects of storms like sandy is damage to home and apartments and displacement of families and
should defeat coburn. mrs. feinstein: well, thank you very much, madam president. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: thank you, mr. president. one of the things that i have learned in chairing the energy and water subcommittee, which is the committee that handles appropriations for the army corps of engineers, is how really difficult it is to get projects started, funded and constructed. and so i am one, particularly in view of storms, earthquakes, floods, damages, that you also need to do the mitigation because once it happens once, there's a heavy likelihood that it could happen again. so i rise in opposition to this amendment. the provision that the senator from oklahoma proposes would essentially take a project that's authorized, that has gone to the corps for study -- i beg your pardon? the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. mrs. feinstein: may i ask for two minutes additional time, please. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. mrs. feinstein: thank you very much. would essentially take a corps project that ha
the rest of the statement for the record. thank you. >> madam secretary. >> good morning, chairman menendez, thank you for the opportunity to testify regarding recovery from superstorm sandy. in my role as to the secretary of grant programs with hud i am responsible for the community development's block grant program, the disaster recovery grant and home program. the disaster recovery program is critical to helping communities recover from and rebuild after natural disasters like superstorm sandy. this morning i will discuss sandy's impact on housing and the work had has started and will continue for long term recovery in the region. additional details on these points on secretary donovan's role as head of the sandy recovery task force are provided in witness testimony. hurricane sandy and the nor'easter that followed had massive and very impact on the atlantic coast from virginia to rhode island. especially hard hit were new york and new jersey, two of the nation's critical economic engines. one of the major effects of storms like sandy is damage to homes and apartments and individuals, ex
. mikulski: madam president? the presiding officer: under the previous order, there will be two minutes of debate equally divided prior to a vote in relation to amendment number 3393 offered by the senator from maryland, mr. cardin. ms. mikulski: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. ms. mikulski: first of all, madam president, the senate is not in order. and if i could outline -- the presiding officer: may we have order in the chamber, please. ms. mikulski: if the chamber could be in order, i could outline what i think would be an expeditious way of disposing many amendments that would be done in a collegial way. it is my understanding that we will be able to adopt a number of amendments by voice. in order to do that, i will call up a few more amendments now en bloc before a voice vote on the amendments. i ask unanimous consent to call up the following amendments en bloc: grassley 3348 and feinstein 32 -- excuse me, feinstein 3421, as amended. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection, the clerk will report the amendments by number. the c
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23